Korean-billy

We find out what’s behind Korean Billy’s fascination with The Asda

"I'm going de Asda for some scran, la"

By Alison Lynch, 30 November 2016
We find out what’s behind Korean Billy’s fascination with The Asda

If you haven't heard of Korean Billy, you're missing out. He's proper boss, la.

Billy (real name Seong-Jae Kong), is a 25-year-old vlogger based in Seoul, who is teaching the world to speak Scouse. 

He developed an interest in British culture and dialect while studying at the University of Central Lancashire as an exchange student in 2015. He lived in Preston but made several trips to Liverpool during his stay and fell in love with the accent, the way of life and, specifically, the local slang.  

When he returned to Seoul, he decided to create a YouTube channel where he could teach his compatriots how to talk like a proper Scouser. 

His favourite Scouse words are 'brekkie', 'scran' and 'la' (an abbreviation of 'lad'). 

But one quirk particularly fascinated Billy - the way people from Liverpool say 'The Asda', instead of just 'Asda'. For example, instead of saying "I'm off to Asda for some food," a Scouser might say, "I'm going de Asda for some scran, la". 

He was so taken with the idea, he's even created his own parody of Asda's Christmas ad - called "THE" Asda Christmas Ad - which comes with its own strapline: "Get everything boss at The Asda". 

When we contacted him to find out more, he told us: "I’ve been waiting for the Asda’s 2016 Christmas ad. Right after watching the Asda’s Christmas Made Better ad, I couldn’t help making a parody."

Sadly for Billy, as he lived in woolyback-land,  he wasn't able to shop at the Asda as much as he would have liked while in the UK. "I lived in Preston, and there wasn’t any Asda store in the city centre, so I couldn’t actually shop at the Asda, which was quite sad to me," he said. "However, when I travelled around the UK, I definitely went to the Asda for my stuff." Go ed Billy!

As for his favourite scran, he says he loved a good Sunday roast at the carvery and having scones with tea. He adds: "It’s sad that I couldn’t actually try Scouse, the meat stew. I will definitely try it when I visit the UK again."

Asked what people in South Korea think of his Scouse tutorials, he told us: "Quite a few Korean people are interested in Liverpool because of Liverpool FC, so many of the Korean viewers said they found my Scouse lessons very interesting and wanted to visit Liverpool! The Korean viewers also say that Liverpool seems to be a very friendly city."

Although he fancies himself a specialist in Scouse, he does plan to diversify into other dialects, like Geordie, in the future. 

Howay man!