Rolled oats and blueberries with a metal spoon

This is why you should eat breakfast every day

A new infographic from Moma shows the importance of starting the day with a healthy breakfast

By Asda Good Living, 28 January 2016
This is why you should eat breakfast every day

Do you make sure you're eating a healthy breakfast every day, or do you regularly skip a morning meal in favour of getting the rest of the family out the door on time?

The pros vastly outweigh the cons of making time for a meal each morning

While it might seem like the easiest part of your morning routine to skip, the health benefits of eating breakfast are really too important to ignore. For example, did you know that eating breakfast within two hours of waking up can change the way your metabolism works and eating more for breakfast than at dinner time can help with weight loss? Plus, a healthy breakfast can provide the necessary protein, fibre, iron, vitamins and calcium and minerals essential for growth and development in children.

A new study shows that women are more likely to prioritise hair and make-up over breakfast, with 29 per cent saying they are too busy getting ready to eat a healthy breakfast! If this sounds familiar, take a look at this infographic to see how the pros vastly outweigh the cons of making time for a meal each morning...

And as if that wasn't enough to have you setting the alarm ten minutes earlier and reaching for the rolled oats, there's also new research that suggests your morning latte is actually good for you! Scientists at the University of California have said people are missing out on the many health benefits of tea and coffee by avoiding drinks with high caffeine content.

Dr Gregory Marcus, who undertook the study, said it was time for people to re-consider coffee as part of their morning routine. 'We may unnecessarily be discouraging consumption of items like chocolate, coffee and tea that might actually have cardiovascular benefits.'

The new study has been published in the Journal of the American Heart Association and analysed the caffeine consumption of 1,388 participants. 61 per cent of the people monitored had more than one caffeinated product a day.

Inspired to take up coffee? Learn how to make a latte in six simple steps with our how-to!

Or discover eight new ways to shake-up your breakfast for a more interesting morning meal.